Everything you Need to Know about Fuzz Testing

By John King, CISSP, PMP, CISM •  Updated: 01/01/23 •  3 min read

Fuzz testing, also known as fuzzing or brute force testing, is a software testing technique that involves providing invalid, unexpected, or random data as inputs to a computer program to test its behavior and identify potential vulnerabilities. Fuzz testing aims to uncover defects and security vulnerabilities that may not be discovered through traditional testing methods, such as manual testing or automated testing using fixed inputs.

Fuzz testing is often used to test programs that handle input from external sources, such as network protocols, file parsers, and user input forms. By providing a wide range of invalid and unexpected inputs, fuzz testing can help to identify flaws in the program’s input validation and handling mechanisms, which can lead to security vulnerabilities or other defects.

There are several types of fuzz testing, including:

Fuzz testing can be performed manually or using automated tools. Manual fuzz testing involves manually creating and inputting test cases, while automated fuzz testing involves using a tool that automatically generates and inputs test cases. Automated fuzz testing tools can be particularly useful for large programs or for testing programs that handle a large volume of input data.

There are several benefits to fuzz testing, including:

There are also some challenges to fuzz testing, including:

Overall, fuzz testing is valuable for identifying defects and security vulnerabilities in programs that handle input from external sources. By providing a wide range of invalid and unexpected input data, fuzz testing can help to uncover defects and vulnerabilities that may not be discovered through traditional testing methods. While it requires specialized knowledge and resources, the benefits of fuzz testing can make it a worthwhile investment for organizations looking to improve the robustness and security of their software.

John King, CISSP, PMP, CISM

John King currently works in the greater Los Angeles area as a ISSO (Information Systems Security Officer). John has a passion for learning and developing his cyber security skills through education, hands on work, and studying for IT certifications.